Is It Illegal to Get Free Music?

The Confusion Surrounding Music Copyright Law
As there are many different method to get free music off the world wide web, there’s come to be a great deal of confusion and contradictory views regarding what is lawful and what is not.
“OK, so it is illegal to burn off a copy of a CD and distribute it. So are you telling me that I cannot burn a combination CD and give it to some of my buddies?”

“It is illegal to download free tunes of peer-to-peer sites and servers, but can I download a song from my buddy within Dropbox?”
These kinds of song copying and supply render many feeling that the laws are outdated and vague, so they simply continue downloading songs illegally.
The increasingly common method of “YouTube into mp3” in which you catch the mp3 file in the movie someone posted of a tune has added to the issue.
Is that illegal also?
Let us have a look.
The FBI Warning
You know how if you are watching a film on a DVD (for all those folks who do this) and also on the display comes that recognizable “FBI WARNING” that informs you that the content is copyrighted and it is illegal to make unauthorized copies of said material of any sort… etc..

Well, regardless of what some obsolete posts might state, this copyright (or online piracy) law also applies to songs.
What exactly does that mean?
Redistribution of any type, without the artists agree, is prohibited. And if you participate by intentionally downloading Royalty Free Music that’s being distributed without the artist’s approval, you’re engaging in illegal action.

This article in IBM compared utilizing these third party websites simply to rip songs from YouTube, such as “using tape tapes to record music of their radio”.

And peer-to-peer servers in addition to some other sites which don’t even technically capture the documents on their site, are still engaging in this illegal action, and later on, copyright businesses continue to be breaking down on this action.